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Creatonotos gangis

Creatonotos gangis
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Creatonotos gangis moth of the Arctine family is native to Australia and Southeast Asia. Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus described it first in 1763 in his book Centuria Insectorum.

Description and Identification

Caterpillar

Creatonotos Gangis Moth Caterpillar
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Creatonotos Gangis Larva
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They have a brown hairy body marked with yellow stripes on their back. The larva feeds on several human foods like sorghum, sweet potato, ragi, and rice.

Scientific Classification


  • Family: Erebidae
  • Genus: Creatonotos
  • Scientific Name: Creatonotos Gangis

Pupa

The larva pupates on dead leaves and remains enclosed within a hairy cocoon.

Adult Moth

Sexual Dimorphism: Present

Color and Appearance: When opened, the forewings appear brown, and the hind wings are white, with all four of them having dark streaks running across. When closed, the appearance does not change though the dark streaks get partially visible.

Their abdomen that is red, and sometimes even yellow is bigger and rounder in males.

Creatonotos Gangis Moth
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Creatonotos Gangis Moth Image
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Average wingspan: 4 cm 

Flight pattern: Consistent

Season: Not recorded

Eggs

The eggs are round and yellow, laid in rows on the leaves of host plants.

Quick Facts

DistributionSouth East (India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Iran, Thailand, China, Japan); Australia (Queensland, New Guinea, Northern Territory, and Mackay)
HabitatMostly near their host plants; the larvae dwell near pomegranate trees
PredatorsBats, and birds
Lifespan of adults5 – 7 days
Host plants  / Larva foodPennisetum americanum, lucerne crops, coffee, rice, sweet potato, sorghum, ragi, sweet potato, groundnuts 
Adult dietMainly the nectar of host plants

Did You Know

  • The males of this species often appear big and inflated mostly due to their scent organs, often exceeding the size of their abdomens.
  • The Cretanotos gangis’ caterpillar ingests toxic plants containing alkaloid chemicals that help in the growth of their scent glands, but, they are not considered harmful.
Creatonotos Gangis Female
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Male Creatonotos Gangis Moth
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Creatonotos Gangis Moth Picture
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